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‘Oh, To Be In England, Now That April’s There’ – Robert Browning

April 10th, 2014 by Beverley in Library and Archives

April 23rd is St George’s day and is also regarded as Shakespeare’s birthday. A good month then to read a novel set in England. There are plenty to choose from in the ‘Literature in Education Collection’.

The classics are well represented by ‘Nicholas Nickleby’ or’ Hard Times’ by Charles Dickens, ‘The Professor’ by Charlotte Bronte or ‘Dr Wortle’s School’ by Anthony Trollope.

Why not try ‘Lucky Jim’ by Kingsley Amis, ‘An Academic Question ‘ by Barbara Pym, ‘ To Sir With Love’ by E.R. Braithwaite or ‘The Longest Journey’ by E. M. Forster?

Alternatively, read the futuristic ‘Never Let Me Go’ by Kazuo Ishiguro, ‘Jill’ the only novel written by the poet Philip Larkin, ‘Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit’ by Jeanette Winterson or ‘Almost English‘ by Charlotte Mendelson.

If you are in the mood for a gently humorous read then ‘The Village School’ by Miss Read or ‘The Little Village School‘ by Gervase Phinn certainly fit the bill.

Crime novels are always popular; read about what happens when a Ghanaian girl is sent to a boarding school in Devon in ‘True Murder‘ by Yaba Badoe. Or, for a more traditional example of the genre,  you might like to read ‘Gaudy Night’ by Dorothy L Sayers.

Of course, you could also borrow a DVD if you would prefer to watch a film. ‘If’, ‘Another Country’, ‘The Browning Version’, ‘The History Boys’ and ‘The Happiest Days of Your Life’ are all highly recommended.

 


New library resources

March 28th, 2014 by Emma in Library and Archives

Whilst looking through the new publications catalogues of Education books, I was pleased to find that many of the new titles are already available in the library.  Also, many of the titles that haven’t yet been published have already been selected for purchase!

For us, new titles don’t just mean brand new publications though; avid library users will know that we have many Special Collections, including our impressive Official Publications  collection, which have lots of older and rarer content. Recent donations from Universities UK and City & Guilds have meant that many important documents have been added to this collection, some dating back to the early 50’s, so it been really is great to receive them.

Another recent donation, by a former teacher, included a copy of ‘Happy Venture Teacher’s Manual’ by Fred Schonell, published in 1959. The Happy Venture reading scheme was very popular throughout the 1950s and 60’s so it’s really wonderful to have been given a copy of this book.

image (3)

Check our new titles link on the library catalogue to see item information about the hundreds of new publications we have in the library, and, if you have educational books or reports which you no longer want or need, just get in touch and let me know- you may be helping to fill a gap in our collection!


Values education

March 20th, 2014 by Emma in Library and Archives

Values in teacher education: selected published papers, conference papers and reviews’ by Nick Mead was recently acquired by the IOE library when the author popped in to donate some copies to us. This publication brings together an interesting bulk of work on ‘values education’, an area which is central to concepts of schooling and the ‘hidden’ curriculum.

Based on recent research and legislation, this publication aims to address a gap in comprehensive representative information on values education within teacher training. Although subjects such as Citizenship, Personal studies and Religious Studies have attempted to address the subject, there has been little consistency in how it is taught and no definitive subject area to which it belongs. Consequently, values education has remained a largely nebulous concept in the UK- an oversight which this publication seeks to redress. If you are interested in this important aspect of education, why not borrow Nick’s book and gain a greater insight into this topic.

Also, remember to use our new floor plan feature on the library catalogue to help you find the exact location.

Floor plan


Reminder of the Friends Study Day next Tuesday

March 18th, 2014 by Becky in Library and Archives

Join us on Tuesday, March 25th 2014, for our annual Friends
of Newsam Library & Archives’ (FNLA) Study Day. This year’s event, “Anthem
for doomed youth”?: exploring conflict and resolution through archives, considers
the concepts of war, conflict and peace through the lense of learning and
education.

Document Reference: BDN/64

Document Reference: BDN/64

The day’s programme:

9.45-10.00 Welcome and Introductions (Sean Curran)
10.00-10.30 Activities in the Library and Archives (Sarah Aitchison)
10.30-11.30 Professor Stuart Foster Centenary First World War Battlefields Project
11.30-12.30 Dr Barry Blades, Teachers and the Great War, 1914-1919
12.30-13.30
Lunch (please bring your own).  Tea and coffee will be provided.
13.30- 14.30 Walter Lewis, Educating Service Children in the 20th Century
14.30-15.30 Alix Hall, Thinking Outside the Box: Using Archives to Teach Perspectives on Wartime
15.30-16.00 Archive showcase of relevant collections from the Library Special Collections and Archives

Where: Newsam Library & Archives, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London
When: Tuesday, 25 March 2014 from 09:30 to 16:00
Register for free tickets here.

Find out more about the Friends of Newsam Library & Archives, including how to become a member, here.

Friends Logo


In honour of Open Education Week, a LibGuide on Open Education Resources

March 13th, 2014 by Emma in Library and Archives

As it is Open Education week, I thought it was time to finalize our latest LibGuide – Open Education: OER and OA . OA and OER are ‘buddies’ (!) as you can see from the image below taken from the University of Michigan’s OER Toolkit because they both promote resources that are freely available.


Source: University of Michigan OER Toolkit

The difference between the two, as you can see from the diagram is the need for the OER to include an open license, i.e. a Creative Commons license (you can find out more about the Creative Commons licenses from the LibGuide on IPR and Copyright).
The OER and OA LibGuide is organized by learning phase with separate tabs for Special Education and Lifelong Learning as clearly these areas intersect with all phases of learning.
We also want to also flag up the numerous research reports produced by organisations such as the Sutton Trust and NFER, as the increasing proliferation of non-governmental born-digital resources means it is almost impossible for us to keep up with these outputs on our online Library Catalogue.
Open Education resources are a great way of accessing teaching and learning resources and, (to quote OER commons, which is one of the biggest OER platforms), they are a great way to ‘discover, share and evaluate’ resources.
So, before you re-create teaching materials, why not check this guide first? You may want to bookmark this guide and keep updated on our regular featured resources column. And, if you discover new open access resources which are not listed, please let us know so that we can add them.


Got a question?

March 7th, 2014 by Barbara in Library and Archives

  • What?   ‘Effective literature searching’ lunchtime sessions
  • Who can attend?   anyone with a search query or concern
  • Where?   Library Teaching Room, Level 4 Library
  • When?  12.30 – 1.30 on 19th & 26th March, 30th April and 7th May

Whether you’ve got a 20,000 word dissertation looming, a 5000 word paper or you’re just curious to know more about databases, library staff will be hosting lunchtime literature searching sessions four times in the next few months.  We will be happy to respond to your literature searching queries and to carry out demonstrations on databases and the library catalogue.  If you would like to attend, you can book your place here.

 

 


Ambiguities that need to be considered: primary and secondary sources

March 5th, 2014 by Nazlin Bhimani in Research Support, Special Collections

Is it a rabbit or a duck?

At my “Information and Literature” searching class last night, we looked at the mind maps (outlining concepts and keywords) which the MPhil/PhD students had worked on as part of their pre-search homework.  These were created so that the students could visualise their research question and gather in one place the subject terms, keywords, concepts, theories, theorists, and even their searches. One example of a work in progress is this wonderfully complex map created by one of the students – see: https://bubbl.us/h=e7037/3d0dcb/94xc5TUxtDwNI    But one thing led to another … for after the discussion, I asked the students what primary sources they were intending to use.  The students were puzzled when I explained that if they are generating qualitative or quantitative data, that would be considered a primary source but so could other types of sources.

This caused a little bit of confusion so I thought I would take the opportunity to clarify definitions and give some examples on this post. My question was also an opportunity for me to highlight the findings from the Researchers of Tomorrow, JISC-British Library sponsored, 3-year study involving some 17,000 doctoral students from 70 U.K. universities.  This study found that doctoral students’ continued reliance on secondary sources was lowering the quality of PhD output in the U.K. and many PhD students were simply regurgitating existing secondary literature.  By way of explanation, it is perhaps important to provide an explanation here:  A lot of original work involves looking freshly at secondary sources. I could, for example offer a major critique of an existing secondary source such as a philosophical work and I would be creating new knowledge. However the study’s conclusion is a worrying and I believe definitions of primary and secondary source material are somewhat more fluid than at first glance, and we need to adopt some caution.  Let me explain: Read the rest of this entry »


Study Day: “Anthem for doomed youth”?: exploring conflict and resolution through archives

February 12th, 2014 by Becky in Library and Archives

Join us on Tuesday, March 25th 2014, for our annual Friends
of Newsam Library & Archives’ (FNLA) Study Day. This year’s event, “Anthem
for doomed youth”?: exploring conflict and resolution through archives, considers
the concepts of war, conflict and peace through the lense of learning and
education.

Document Reference: BDN/64

Document Reference: BDN/64

The day’s programme:

9.45-10.00 Welcome and Introductions (Sean Curran)
10.00-10.30 Activities in the Library and Archives (Sarah Aitchison)
10.30-11.30 Professor Stuart Foster Centenary First World War Battlefields Project
11.30-12.30 Dr Barry Blades, Teachers and the Great War, 1914-1919
12.30-13.30
Lunch (please bring your own).  Tea and coffee will be provided.
13.30- 14.30 Walter Lewis, Educating Service Children in the 20th Century
14.30-15.30 Alix Hall, Thinking Outside the Box: Using Archives to Teach Perspectives on Wartime
15.30-16.00 Archive showcase of relevant collections from the Library Special Collections and Archives

Where: Newsam Library & Archives, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London
When: Tuesday, 25 March 2014 from 09:30 to 16:00
Register for free tickets here.

Find out more about the Friends of Newsam Library & Archives, including how to become a member, here.

Friends Logo


Creating a LibGuide from the process of research by Professor Gemma Moss

February 4th, 2014 by Nazlin Bhimani in Library and Archives, Special Collections

The following is a guest post by Professor of Education at the Institute, Gemma Moss.  Professor Moss writes about her experience of creating a LibGuide from the process of   researching 19th century historical sources on literacy attainment – see: http://libguides.ioe.ac.uk/literacyattainment

Professor Gemma Moss

Last year I completed an ESRC-funded research project investigating the collection and use of literacy attainment data in the nineteenth century, with the policy of “payment by results” as the main focus.  I started out with very little idea of how education was organised in the 19th century, and how the process of teaching children to read was conceptualised, or which primary sources might act as my best guide to any of this.  As I tracked back from the attainment data themselves, presented in the form of annual accounts in the reports of the Committee of Council on Education, to the policy of payment by results, and its genesis in the Newcastle Commission, I found myself becoming increasingly interested in understanding how the policy related to everyday school practice.  This in turn led me on the trail of the common textbooks in use in elementary schools to teach literacy and their changing form, as well as their antecedents in the previous century.  There are some good secondary guides to sources.  Ian Michael’s  The teaching of English: from the sixteenth century to 1870 (published in 1987) stands out.  But I wanted to set the texts in their context of use.  This meant widening the scope of enquiry to take in: the examinations set by the early Teacher Training colleges, advice manuals written for teachers prescribing different approaches, as well as journals written for school sponsors, and school or pupil teachers (Laaden Fletcher’s, The Teachers’ Press in Britain, 1802-1880  (1978) is an invaluable guide to the latter).  As I followed the leads I realised that I was amassing information that might be useful to anyone following in my own footsteps.  The library guide is the end result.  By working with Nazlin Bhimani, in charge of the Institute of Education’s Special Collections, we’ve been able to bring into the same place a variety of resources  that set literacy teaching in the nineteenth century in its broader policy context and highlight the very different communities of practice that reflected on literacy teaching, its point and purpose, at that time.   This has included embedding hotlinks to materials that are available in digitised versions on Google Books, signposting users to collections worth visiting in other libraries, as well as the collections we hold here at IOE.  The review of sources amassed in this way has also provided grounds for extending the special collections held at the IOE with some new purchases that will fill out the study of literacy teaching and its development for anyone who comes after. In particular, Nazlin was able to purchase some of Sarah Trimmer‘s works which the Library did not have in stock.

All of this has been an interesting insight into the scope and range of the collections in the Newsam Library and their contribution to scholarship.  I hope that others follow in my footsteps, and are able to make similar links between their topics of enquiry and the work of the Specialist Librarians and Archivists here at IOE.

 


Holocaust Memorial Day, 27 January 2014

January 27th, 2014 by Elizabeth in Library and Archives

Holocaust Memorial Day is a day to remember the millions of people killed both in the Holocaust – 27 January marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp – and in subsequent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.

The Library is currently showing a selection of books (fiction and non-fiction) and other materials from its Curriculum Resources Collection to tie in with Holocaust Memorial Day 2014, which takes place on 27th January and whose theme is ‘Journeys’:

The experience of those affected by the Holocaust and genocide is characterised by forced journeys. Many of these journeys ended in death; some ended in survival. There are journeys too, made after liberation: to life in new countries, or returning home to the places where neighbours may have contributed to the persecution. Individuals and families were forced to move away from their homes and familiar surroundings, into the unknown. These journeys were mostly undertaken in fear and in ignorance of what would be found at the journey’s end. Refugees travelled across countries and across seas. In deportations and death marches, the journey itself was a means of degrading, persecuting and killing Jews, political prisoners and many others.

(From the website of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust)

We hope you will find the display, which is on the shelves near the stairwell on Level 4, interesting and can use some of the materials in your classrooms. More information on the Curriculum Resources Collection is available at: http://libguides.ioe.ac.uk/curriculumresources


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